Hopp til hovedinnhold

Concluded their visit in crisp winter weather

Activities on the second day of the visit to Norway of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge included serious issues as well as sports and outdoor recreation. They visited Hartvig Nissen school, where the series SKAM was filmed, rode to the top of the Holmenkollen Ski Jump and roasted stick bread at Øvresetertjern forest lake.

02.02.2018

The drama series SKAM is a global success and touches on many important issues. The series was filmed at Hartvig Nissen upper-secondary school in Oslo, and this morning Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Their Royal Highnesses The Crown Prince and Crown Princess went to visit the school. They wanted to talk with pupils and the actors and producers behind the popular series. All the pupils gathered in the schoolyard to greet their visitors. 

SKAM actors Tarjei Sandvik Moe, Ulrikke Falch, Iman Meskini, Josefine Pettersen, Ina Svenningdal and Carl Martin Eggesbø and the other students wait for the Royals to arrive at Hartvig Nissen Upper Secondary School. Photo: Terje Pedersen / NTB scanpixSKAM actors Tarjei Sandvik Moe, Ulrikke Falch, Iman Meskini, Josefine Pettersen, Ina Svenningdal and Carl Martin Eggesbø and the other students wait for the Royals to arrive at Hartvig Nissen Upper Secondary School. Photo: Terje Pedersen / NTB scanpix

The SKAM effect

The Duke and Duchess and Crown Prince and Crown Princess share a deep commitment to issues related to mental health. SKAM addresses many of the challenges young people face in today’s society. The series has focused on a range of difficult topics such as identity issues, sexual assault, bullying and eating disorders.

What are the impacts of a series like this? What is it like to be a young person in Norway today? These are questions that the Royal guests wished to discuss and learn more about at Hartvig Nissen today. They also spoke with pupils and school nurses on mental health and how the school health service works.

The Duke and Duchess, The Crown Prince and Crown Princess with SKAM actors at Hartvig Nissen. Photo: Sven Gj. Gjeruldsen, The Royal CourtThe Duke and Duchess, The Crown Prince and Crown Princess with SKAM actors at Hartvig Nissen. Photo: Sven Gj. Gjeruldsen, The Royal Court

Luncheon at Skaugum Estate

The Crown Prince and Crown Princess invited the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge to a luncheon at Skaugum Estate before embarking on the next part of the programme.

The Crown Prince and Crown Princess invited the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge to a luncheon at Skaugum Estate. Photo: Sven Gj. Gjeruldsen, The Royal Court.The Crown Prince and Crown Princess invited the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge to a luncheon at Skaugum Estate. Photo: Sven Gj. Gjeruldsen, The Royal Court.

Their dog Muffins Kråkebolle took the opportunity to join the party.

Winter sports at Holmenkollen

After lunch the stage was set for a new experience, as Crown Prince Haakon and Crown Princess Mette-Marit accompanied the Duke and Duchess up to Holmenkollen for a brief introduction to Norwegian winter sports.

The Ski Museum at Holmenkollen houses exhibitions on the most renowned polar expeditions, including the race to the South Pole between Roald Amundsen and Robert Falcon Scott in 1911–1912. The Duke and Duchess viewed that exhibition and spent some time looking at Queen Maud’s skiing equipment. Born and raised in England, Queen Maud did not learn to ski until she arrived in Norway. Her teacher was none other than Fridtjof Nansen.

Former ski jumping World Champion Runa Velta and ski jumper Anniken Mork spoke with the British guests about what it takes to perform a long ski jump. Photo: Cornelius Poppe, NTB scanpix.Former ski jumping World Champion Runa Velta and ski jumper Anniken Mork spoke with the British guests about what it takes to perform a long ski jump. Photo: Cornelius Poppe, NTB scanpix.


The party then went up to the top of the ski jumping tower. With the dizzying view as a backdrop, former ski jumping World Champion Runa Velta and ski jumper Anniken Mork spoke with the British guests about what they do to overcome fear and what it takes to perform a long ski jump.

There was a demonstration as well. From the stand where the Royal Family has watched countless ski jumping competitions, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge were able to watch several ski jumpers, including 16-year-old Olav Dvergsdal Prestegård.

From the stand where the Royal Family has watched countless ski jumping competitions, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge were able to watch several ski jumpers. Photo: Terje Pedersen / NTB scanpixFrom the stand where the Royal Family has watched countless ski jumping competitions, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge were able to watch several ski jumpers. Photo: Terje Pedersen / NTB scanpix 

Concluded with a campfire

Norwegians enjoy an active outdoor life summer and winter alike. Day-care centres also offer many outdoor activities for children, and the outdoor kindergarten by Øvresetertjern offers more than most.

The Royal guests joined the children in roasting sausages and bread-on-a-stick. Photo: Håkon Mosvold Larsen / NTB scanpix
The Royal guests joined the children in roasting sausages and bread-on-a-stick. Photo: Håkon Mosvold Larsen / NTB scanpix


In the cold but beautiful winter weather the Royal guests joined the kindergarten group in roasting sausages and bread-on-a-stick over a campfire, and some of the children showed the Duke and Duchess how well they could ski.

The event was published live at the Kongehuset Facebook page:

 

Many of those present carried both Norwegian and British flags, and the visit ended on a convivial note.  

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge concluded their visit to Norway by Øvresetertjern. Photo: Håkon Mosvold Larsen / NTB scanpixThe Duke and Duchess of Cambridge concluded their visit to Norway by Øvresetertjern. Photo: Håkon Mosvold Larsen / NTB scanpix



 

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